From Our Blog

A place to search and comment on NCCOR-authored content and childhood obesity research and trends

Kids eat more healthful foods during longer, quieter school lunch

Nov. 27, 2014, The Washington Post

It’s hard to get kids to eat healthful foods, especially at school. But a new study suggests that, by changing the lunch environment, schools can encourage kids to make better choices without even changing their menus.

This study, conducted by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, found that students buying school lunches select a fruit or vegetable only about half the time, and even then most don’t eat even a single bite. Continue reading

Posted on by  |  Read more...

Report: Global obesity costs hit $2 trillion

Nov. 20, 2014, Yahoo! News

By Danica Kirka, Associated Press

The global cost of obesity has risen to $2 trillion annually — nearly as much as smoking or the combined impact of armed violence, war, and terrorism, according to a new report released Nov. 20.

The McKinsey Global Institute consulting firm’s report focused on the economics of obesity, putting it among the top three social programs generated by human beings. It puts its impact at 2.8 percent of global gross domestic product. Continue reading

Posted on by  |  Read more...

Marketers of sugary drinks still target U.S. children

Nov. 19, 2014, Reuters

By Anjali Athavaley

U.S. children and teens are seeing fewer TV commercials for sugary drinks, but they remain a prime target for marketers through product placement, social media, and other means, according to a report released on Nov. 19.

The study, conducted by researchers at the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity, said 6- to 11-year-olds viewed 39 percent fewer television ads for sugary drinks in 2013 than in 2010. Teens saw a 30 percent drop. Continue reading

Posted on by  |  Read more...

Read more blog entries

Recent Tweets


   

Did You Know?

 
 

In order to achieve a healthy balance in the U.S. food system, by what percentage would the vegetable supply need to increase?