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A place to search and comment on NCCOR-authored content and childhood obesity research and trends

Elevating the impact of nutrition and obesity policy research and evaluation

Public policy can play a major role in impacting childhood obesity, yet little is known about the role of nutrition and obesity policy research in informing public policy decisions.

A supplement published in the April issue of Preventing Chronic Disease includes an essay and three articles examining the role of nutrition and obesity policy research and evaluation. The supplement was organized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Nutrition and Obesity Policy Research and Evaluation Network (NOPREN).

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USDA center releases behavioral economics grant and fellowship opportunities

Up to five grants of $50,000 and six fellowships with $15,000 in seed grant funding were announced by Duke University and the University of North Carolina (UNC), Chapel Hill U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Center for Behavioral Economics and Healthy Food Choice Research (BECR Center).

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Just announced: Dietary Guidelines for Americans Summit on May 21

Register now to join The Ohio State University Food Innovation Center, The Ohio State University John Glenn College of Public Affairs, and National Geographic as they host the Dietary Guidelines for Americans Summit on May 21, from 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., Eastern, at National Geographic’s Grosvenor Auditorium in Washington, DC. The Summit is free of charge and will convene nationally recognized experts to consider the role of the Dietary Guidelines in delivering relevant, practical, and actionable nutrition guidance for diverse consumers across the nation. The program features:

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Kindergarten children who watched television for more than one hour a day were more than ___ percent more likely to be overweight than their schoolmates who watched less TV.