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A place to search and comment on NCCOR-authored content and childhood obesity research and trends

Few schools adhered to USDA nutrition standards before 2013

Nov. 17, 2014, Reuters

By Kathryn Doyle

Before the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) set strict standards for nutrition for federally reimbursable lunch programs, less than 2 percent of middle or high schools would have measured up.

The absence of certain standards was associated with youth obesity, according to a new study. Full implementation of the program, which should be happening now, may have a notable impact on adolescent health, though this study did not address implementation of the program, the authors write. Continue reading

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Revised food labels still won’t tell whole story

Oct. 26, 2014, The New York Times [Well Blog]

By Jane E. Brody

Are you among the half of Americans who say they check the nutrition labels on packaged foods when shopping? If you can read the information without a magnifying glass, do you understand what the many numbers mean to your health?

Do you look only at calories, or do you also check the amounts of sugar, sodium, protein, or dietary fiber in a serving? And does the serving size listed represent how much you might actually consume at a sitting? Continue reading

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Registration now open for Active Living Research’s Annual Conference

Registration is now open for the Active Living Research (ALR) 2015 Annual Conference. The theme of the 2015 conference, “The Science of Policy Implementation,” explores the process of taking findings from the research field of active living and using them to inform policies that increase population-level physical activity. The conference will be held Feb. 22-25, 2015 in San Diego. Continue reading

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According to a new study, adolescents who saw printed signs with easy-to-understand calorie information about sugar-sweetened beverages were less likely to buy sugary drinks. What percentage decline did the signage create?